Friday, June 5, 2020

Nature Network Celebrates A Win With "Daniel in the Homophobic Lions' Den" won the Platinum audience choice award of the Changing the Story film festival


Youthful African Refugees Celebrate Hard Won Awards and Accolades during the International Changing the Story Online Film Festival 2020

It happened so fast, at first he thought it was something he would give up. It was something he did not have to tell his parents about as they returned home from school in the afternoon. He had finally kissed another boy he had admired for two terms. That was something easily forgotten and done away with. John is now a refugee and a Male-to-Female Transgender with a boyfriend of 7 years now.
They used to play soccer at a large trailer yard when it was empty next to Kampala’s Industrial Area. At this time of the year, boys and girls from different housing estates would play up to around 2:00 pm after which they had to rush back home. Maria and two other girls were ‘fillers’ in the soccer team but they played better than the boys. The boys ridiculed them and the neighbourhood never wanted anything to do with “those girls who shout so loud at the top of their voices and all the while playing soccer.” Maria is now a lesbian leader among refugees awaiting resettlement in Australia.
Maria and John (not their real names) are very talented. John sings so well that she (preferred pronoun) is invited to Karaoke competitions in Nairobi from which she returns with accolades. Maria is a team-builder and community organiser and he (preferred pronoun) has contributed to grassroots organising in many parts of Africa. These two and many others have turned their skills in health promotion, community mobilisation, social-justice, leadership, arts, music, dance, drama, heritage, and human rights to support LGBTIQQ and Sex-workers’ approaches to civil society building following relocation from their countries of birth; assimilation in local host communities; joining communities to fight TB/HIV/Malaria and COVID-19; and in many post-conflict scenarios.
The ingredients of life are many and they include: the air we breathe; the blood coursing through our veins; the ground we set our feet upon; the diverse plants and animals; the communities and homes; the parents, relatives and friends; the various seen and un seen things. These make up the life we preserve and thrive upon.  The two films that were chosen during the Changing the Story (CTS) Film Festival came to life because of many minute or large events. The events are many and they included: University of Leeds’ Theology Department choosing one East African Country to be a research venue on topics intersecting life such as religion and sexuality; the existence of the Nature Network; the willing members who participated in various discussions which turned out to be part of the presentations. The presentations included: discussion sessions; dialogues; town-halls; reading Bible texts; sharing stories on political contexts in various African countries; discussions on relationship of religious practices on refugee life; hate speeches and acts; child neglect; youths and development in Africa; talent as an avenue to self-determination; working with academics; recreation; drug-related addiction; composing reports; work ethics; home chores; life span organisation and many other issues. These were made into the two films that run no more than 20 minutes each. The two films are: ‘Daniel in the Homophobic lion’s den,’ and ‘Jesus and the Guys charged with indecency.’
According to the CTS website, ‘Daniel in the Homophobic Lion’s Den’ creatively uses stories from the Bible to tell the life experiences of LGBTQI+ Ugandan refugees living in Nairobi. In this film the Nature Network team members used the story of Daniel to celebrate the liberation of the LGBTQI+ community against the anti-homosexuality bill in Uganda.
‘Jesus and the Guys Charged with Indecency,’ creatively uses stories from the Bible to tell the life experiences of LGBTQI+ Ugandan refugees living in Nairobi. In this film, The Nature Network team members used the story of Jesus to play out their experience of stigma, discrimination and violence because of their sexual and gender identity.
These two films were nominated and went on to win many accolades as well including the highest viewership in the first few days. The story of triumph would be incomplete if I did not share the opening remarks of the executive director of the Nature Network who happened to be part of the Q and A Panel before the nominations.
The remarks were part of the presentation on the films. The executive director remarked that “the testimonies, the different open spaces are provided through a committed desire to have their voices, actions, drama, and film to convey solutions to the question of youthful agency, autonomy and self-determination. In the film one watches or meets the youths turning hateful rhetoric into a call for love, direction, inclusion and respectful regard. This is just a sneak peek! I am sure you will come out after watching a more refreshed person. Allow the youths to participate in life-long influencing activities. Empower them!"
A toast is in order! A thank you goes to all refugees who in one way or another made all this work possible. To them and many others who contribute to that collective livelihood in Kenya, Asante Sana!





































Nature Network Leads Several Other African Grassroots-Based CBOs in Promoting A Child Well-Being Campaign From 9th June 2020-8th July 2020

A Born Well Child Campaign 9th June- 8th July 2020

COVID-19 and Aggression toward Children

When you are an adult and that child cannot access hand-washing materials due to your actions or inaction, then that is a COVID-19 related vulnerability and aggression. We must provide opportunities for children to grow and develop well. Every child has the right to be born well, to be cared for and raised well.

When you are a family and the children cannot access food, care, love, compassion, privacy, agency, autonomy and self-determination tools, then that is aggression.

When you are a community and that community cannot provide the necessary safety nets to avoid COVID-19, then that is aggression.

There are different types of abuses:
·         Physical abuse.
·         sexual child abuse (Rape, molestation, child pornography)
·         Neglect (Physical neglect, educational neglect, and lack of protection from diseases)
·         Emotional abuse (Verbal, Mental, or Psychological related)
·         Domestic violence or abuse.
·         Sexual abuse
·         Financial or material abuse
·         Modern slavery
·         Discriminatory abuse
·         Organisational or institutional abuse

These abuses can lead to COVID-19 related vulnerability to children.

The UN states that “It is a sad reality that in situations where armed conflict breaks out, children are the most vulnerable members of societies. Children are most affected by the consequences of war. The six most common violations are recruitment and use of children in war, killing, sexual violence, abduction, attacks on schools and hospitals, and denial of humanitarian access. On 19 August 1982, at its emergency special session on the question of Palestine, the General Assembly, “appalled at the great number of innocent Palestinian and Lebanese children victims of Israel’s acts of aggression”, decided to commemorate 4 June of each year as the International Day of Innocent Children Victims of Aggression. The purpose of the day is to acknowledge the pain suffered by children throughout the world who are the victims of physical, mental and emotional abuse. This day affirms the UN's commitment to protect the rights of children. Its work is guided by the Convention on the Rights of the Child, the most rapidly and widely ratified international human rights treaty in history.”

Whereas the UN lists recruitment into vices and fighting in wars, the Sefton Council on Children has a comprehensive list on why are children and young people vulnerable. High on the agenda is sexual exploitation according to them.

The common issues and reasons can be due to a number of factors including a young person’s low self-esteem and a poor self-image. Young people who run away from home are recognised as being more at risk of being targeted as a victim of sexual exploitation. Vulnerabilities are identified and targeted by the abuser, whether the young person is living with their family, looked after, away from home or they have run away.
Sexual exploitation can be linked to other issues in a child or young person’s life, and authorities may only have limited opportunities to gain their trust so it is very important that we all are able to recognise the warning signs that a child may be a victim of, or at risk of sexual exploitation.
The following are typical vulnerabilities in children prior to abuse:
·         Living in a chaotic or dysfunctional household (including parental substance use, domestic violence, parental mental health issues, parental criminality)
·         History of abuse (including familial child sexual abuse, risk of forced marriage, risk of 'honour'-based violence, physical and emotional abuse and neglect) 
·         Recent bereavement or loss
·         Gang association either through relatives, peers or intimate relationships
·         Attending school with young people who are sexually exploited
·         Learning disabilities
·         Unsure about their sexual orientation or unable to disclose sexual orientation to their families
·         Friends with young people who are sexually exploited
·         Homelessness
·         Lacking friends from the same age group
·         Living in a gang neighbourhood
·         Living in residential care
·         Living in hostel, bed and breakfast accommodation or a foyer
·         Low self-esteem or self-confidence
·         Young care-givers taking care of them.
Our work at grassroots has brought the following issues to our attention too. In order to accommodate the needs of children as they grow we have noted the following are leading to child related life span grown and development. Poverty poorly planned built infrastructure and life endangering practices such as smoking, lack of play areas and the like. 
Physical, economic, social and political factors determine people's level of vulnerability and the extent of their capacity to resist, cope with and recover from hazards. Poverty is a major contributor to vulnerability. We have come up with Prevention Communities of Best Practices (PCOBs). These tap into the traditional African philanthropy and altruism as well as hierarchical organising of communities to set child protection on the agenda at grassroots.
This is part of our campaigns to mark International Days
According to the UN, International days are occasions to educate the public on issues of concern, to mobilize political will and resources to address global problems, and to celebrate and reinforce achievements of humanity. The existence of international days predates the establishment of the United Nations, but the UN has embraced them as a powerful advocacy tool. We also mark other UN observances.
 The Campaign
Theme: A Born Well Child Campaign 9th June- 8th July 2020
Sub-Theme: COVID-19 and Aggression toward Children
9th Tuesday, June 2020
Support Healthy Living for Your Child:
What is safeguarding and child protection?
Safeguarding is the policies and practices that schools, CSOs, FBOs and Governing bodies employ to keep children safe and promote their well-being. Child Protection is a term used to describe the activity that is undertaken to protect specific children who are suffering or likely to suffer significant harm. Child protection is the protection of children from violence, exploitation, abuse and neglect. Child protection systems are a set of usually government-run services designed to protect children and young people who are underage and to encourage family stability.

10th Wednesday, June 2020
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What are the core principles for child protection?
The core principles include: the child's survival and development, best interests of the child, non-discrimination and make sure the child’s participation is sought. These are linked to the purpose of child protection. The purpose of child protection plan is to promote the child's welfare, health and development; Provided it is in the best interests of the child, to support the family and wider family members to safeguard and promote the welfare of their child.

11th Thursday, June 2020
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What are the 7 child safe standards?
There are seven child safe standards:
Standard 1: Governance and leadership.
Standard 2: Clear commitment to child safety.
Standard 3: Code of conduct.
Standard 4: Human resource practices.
Standard 5: Responding and reporting.
Standard 6: Risk management and mitigation.
Standard 7: Empowering children.

12th Friday, June 2020
Support Healthy Living for Your Child:
What are the children's rights?
 Children's rights include the right to health, education, family life, play and recreation, an adequate standard of living and to be protected from abuse and harm. Children's rights cover their developmental and age-appropriate needs that change over time as a child grows up.

13th Saturday, June 2020
Support Healthy Living for Your Child:
What are the children's rights?
 Children's rights include the right to health, education, family life, play and recreation, an adequate standard of living and to be protected from abuse and harm. Children's rights cover their developmental and age-appropriate needs that change over time as a child grows up.

14th Sunday, June 2020
Support Healthy Living for Your Child:
Is there are list one can access to know about children's rights?
 Children's rights include the right to health, education, family life, play and recreation, an adequate standard of living and to be protected from abuse and harm. Yes, there is a list we can share with you. We shall break the list down into about 8 sections.
Article 1
Everyone under 18 years of age has all the rights in this Convention.
Article 2
The Convention applies to everyone whatever their race, religion, abilities, whatever they think or say, whatever type of family they come from.
Article 3
All organisations concerned with children should work towards what is best for each child.
Article 4
Governments should make these rights available to children.
Article 5
Governments should respect the rights and responsibilities of families to direct and guide their children so that, as they grow, they learn to use their rights properly.

15th Monday, June 2020
Support Healthy Living for Your Child:
Is there are list one can access to know about children's rights?
 Children's rights include the right to health, education, family life, play and recreation, an adequate standard of living and to be protected from abuse and harm. Yes, there is a list we can share with you. We shall break the list down into about 8 sections.
Article 6
All children have the right to life. Governments should ensure that children survive and develop healthily.
Article 7
All children have the right to a legally registered name, and nationality. They have the right to know and, as far as possible, to be cared for, by their parents.
Article 8
Governments should respect children's right to a name, a nationality and family ties.
Article 9
Children should not be separated from their parents unless it is for their own good (for example if a parent is mistreating or neglecting a child.) Children whose parents have separated have the right to stay in contact with both parents, unless this might harm the child.
Article 10
Families who live in different countries should be allowed to move between those countries so that parents and children can stay in contact, or get back together as a family.

16th Tuesday, June 2020
Support Healthy Living for Your Child:
Is there are list one can access to know about children's rights?
 Children's rights include the right to health, education, family life, play and recreation, an adequate standard of living and to be protected from abuse and harm. Yes, there is a list we can share with you. We shall break the list down into about 8 sections.
Article 11
Governments should take steps to stop children being taken out of their own country illegally.
Article 12
Children have the right to say what they think should happen, when adults are making decisions that affect them, and to have their opinions taken into account.
Article 13
Children have the right to get and to share information, as long as the information is not damaging to them or to others.
Article 14
Children have the right to think and believe what they want, and to practise their religion, as long as they are not stopping other people from enjoying their rights. Parents should guide their children on these matters.

17th Wednesday, June 2020
Support Healthy Living for Your Child:
Is there are list one can access to know about children's rights?
 Children's rights include the right to health, education, family life, play and recreation, an adequate standard of living and to be protected from abuse and harm. Yes, there is a list we can share with you. We shall break the list down into about 8 sections.
Article 15
Children have the right to meet together and to join groups and organisations, as long as this does not stop other people from enjoying their rights.
Article 16
Children have a right to privacy. The law should protect them from attacks against their way of life, their good name, their families and their homes.
Article 17
Children have the right to reliable information from the mass media. Television, radio, and newspapers should provide information that children can understand, and should not promote materials that could harm children.
Article 18
Both parents share responsibility for bringing up their children, and should always consider what is best for each child. Governments should help parents by providing services to support them, especially if both parents work outside the home.
Article 19
Governments should ensure that children are properly cared for, and protect them from violence, abuse and neglect by their parents, or anyone else who looks after them.
Article 20
Children who cannot be looked after by their own family must be looked after properly, by people who respect their religion, culture and language.

18th Thursday, June 2020
Support Healthy Living for Your Child:
Is there are list one can access to know about children's rights?
Children's rights include the right to health, education, family life, play and recreation, an adequate standard of living and to be protected from abuse and harm. Yes, there is a list we can share with you. We shall break the list down into about 8 sections.
Article 21
When children are adopted the first concern must be what is best for them. The same rules should apply whether the children are adopted in the country where they were born, or if they are taken to live in another country.
Article 22
Children who come into a country as refugees should have the same rights as children born in that country.
Article 23
Children who have any kind of disability should have special care and support, so that they can lead full and independent lives.
Article 24
Children have the right to good quality health care, to clean water, nutritious food, and a clean environment, so that they will stay healthy. Rich countries should help poorer countries achieve this.
Article 25
Children who are looked after by their local authority, rather than by their parents, should have someone review the situation regularly.

19th Friday, June 2020
Support Healthy Living for Your Child:
Is there are list one can access to know about children's rights?
 Children's rights include the right to health, education, family life, play and recreation, an adequate standard of living and to be protected from abuse and harm. Yes, there is a list we can share with you. We shall break the list down into about 8 sections.
Article 26
The Government should provide extra money for the children of families in need.
Article 27
Children have a right to a standard of living that is good enough to meet their physical and mental needs. The Government should help families who cannot afford to provide this.
Article 28
Children have a right to an education. Discipline in schools should respect children’s human dignity. Primary education should be free. Wealthy countries should help poorer countries achieve this.
Article 29
Education should develop each child's personality and talents to the full. It should encourage children to respect their parents, and their own and other cultures.
Article 30
Children have a right to learn and use the language and customs of their families, whether these are shared by the majority of people in the country or not.

20th Saturday, June 2020
Support Healthy Living for Your Child:
Is there are list one can access to know about children's rights?
Children's rights include the right to health, education, family life, play and recreation, an adequate standard of living and to be protected from abuse and harm. Yes, there is a list we can share with you. We shall break the list down into about 8 sections.
Article 31
All children have a right to relax and play, and to join in a wide range of activities.
Article 32
The Government should protect children from work that is dangerous, or that might harm their health or their education.
Article 33
The Government should provide ways of protecting children from dangerous drugs.
Article 34
The Government should protect children from sexual abuse.
Article 35
The Government should make sure that children are not abducted or sold.

21st Sunday, June 2020
Support Healthy Living for Your Child:
Is there are list one can access to know about children's rights?
Children's rights include the right to health, education, family life, play and recreation, an adequate standard of living and to be protected from abuse and harm. Yes, there is a list we can share with you. We shall break the list down into about 8 sections.
Article 36
Children should be protected from any activities that could harm their development.
Article 37
Children who break the law should not be treated cruelly. They should not be put in prison with adults and should be able to keep in contact with their families.
Article 38
Governments should not allow children under 15 to join the army. Children in war zones should receive special protection.
Article 39
Children who have been neglected or abused should receive special help to restore their self-respect.
Article 40
Children who are accused of breaking the law should receive legal help. Prison sentences for children should only be used for the most serious offences.

22nd Monday, June 2020
Support Healthy Living for Your Child:
Is there are list one can access to know about children's rights?
Children's rights include the right to health, education, family life, play and recreation, an adequate standard of living and to be protected from abuse and harm. Yes, there is a list we can share with you. We shall break the list down into about 8 sections.
Article 41
If the laws of a particular country protect children better than the articles of the Convention, then those laws should stay.
Article 42
The Government should make the Convention known to all parents and children

23rd Tuesday, June 2020
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Children’s are rights a big deal
According to jenny Kuper, there is a mass of human rights law, treaty and 'soft law', both general and child-specific, which recognises the distinct status and particular requirements of children. [Children], owing to their particular vulnerability and their significance as the future generation, are entitled to special treatment generally, and, in situations of danger, to priority in the receipt of assistance and protection. There are three parental duties to the child: maintenance, protection, and education. It is the child's right to receive the requirements for normal development, the right of the hungry child to be fed, the right of the sick child to receive health care, the right of the backward child to be reclaimed, the right of orphans to shelter, and the right to protection from exploitation.

24th Wednesday, June 2020
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It Takes a Village to Care for a Child
Children have two types of human rights under international human rights law. They have the same fundamental general human rights as adults, although some human rights, such as the right to marry, are dormant until they are of age, Secondly, they have special human rights that are necessary to protect them during their minority. General rights operative in childhood include the right to security of the person, to freedom from inhuman, cruel, or degrading treatment, and the right to special protection during childhood. Particular human rights of children include, among other rights, the right to life, the right to a name, the right to express his views in matters concerning the child, the right to freedom of thought, conscience and religion, the right to health care, the right to protection from economic and sexual exploitation, and the right to education. Children's rights are defined in numerous ways, including a wide spectrum of civil, politicaleconomic, social and cultural rights. Rights tend to be of two general types: those advocating for children as autonomous persons under the law and those placing a claim on society for protection from harms perpetrated on children because of their dependency. These have been labeled as the right of empowerment and as the right to protection

25th Thursday, June 2020
Support Healthy Living for Your Child:
Children’s are rights a big deal and can be outlined in 10 themes
The child has a need to be nurtured under contexts that also facilitate motherhood and childhood. So these two deserve "special protection and assistance" so that the the right of all children to "social protection” is extended. This protection ensure universality of rights, the right to special protection, and the right to protection from discrimination, among other rights
Particular human rights of children include, among other rights, the right to life, the right to a name, the right to express his views in matters concerning the child, the right to freedom of thought, conscience and religion, the right to health care, the right to protection from economic, sexual exploitation and freedom from  mistreatment.
26th Friday, June 2020
Support Healthy Living for Your Child:
Children’s are rights a big deal and can be outlined in 10 themes
The child has a need to be nurtured under contexts that also facilitate motherhood and childhood. So these two deserve "special protection and assistance" so that the right of all children to "social protection” is extended. This protection ensure universality of rights, the right to special protection, and the right to protection from discrimination, among other rights
Particular human rights of children include, among other rights, the right to life, the right to a name, the right to express his views in matters concerning the child, the right to freedom of thought, conscience and religion, the right to health care, the right to protection from economic and sexual exploitation, and ...

27th Saturday, June 2020
Support Healthy Living for Your Child:
So what are the three P’s?
The United Nations educational guides for children classify the rights outlined in the Convention on the Rights of the Child as the "3 Ps": Provision, Protection, and Participation. They may be elaborated as follows:
Provision: Children have the right to an adequate standard of livinghealth careeducation and services, and to play and recreation. These include a balanced diet, a warm bed to sleep in, and access to schooling.
Protection: Children have the right to protection from abuse, neglect, exploitation and discrimination. This includes the right to safe places for children to play; constructive child rearing behavior, and acknowledgment of the evolving capacities of children.
Participation: Children have the right to participate in communities and have programs and services for themselves. This includes children's involvement in libraries and community programs, youth voice activities, and involving children as decision-makers.

28th Sunday, June 2020
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So what are the other categories of the Child Rights?
Different organisations such as: Human Rights Watch, Child Rights International Network (CRIN) and Amnesty International recognise other categorizes rights.
Economic, social and cultural rights, related to the conditions necessary to meet basic human needs such as food, shelter, education, health care, and gainful employment. Included are rights to education, adequate housing, food, water, the highest attainable standard of health, the right to work and rights at work, as well as the cultural rights of minorities and indigenous peoples.
Environmental, cultural and developmental rights, which are sometimes called "third generation rights," and including the right to live in safe and healthy environments and that groups of people have the right to cultural, political, and economic development.
Amnesty International openly advocates four particular children's rights, including the end to juvenile incarceration without parole, an end to the recruitment of military use of children, ending the death penalty for people under 21, and raising awareness of human rights in the classroom.
Human Rights Watch, an international advocacy organization, includes child labourjuvenile justiceorphans and abandoned children, refugeesstreet children and corporal punishment.
We advocate for social skills that leverage refugee integration in local host communities. This ensures that human dignity is affirmed through access to facilities that improve on one’s agency, autonomy and self –determination.

29th Monday, June 2020
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Children's rights are a subset of human rights with particular attention to the rights of special protection and care afforded to minors. Ensure child rights now and have a thriving community. Rights allow children to grow up healthy and free.
Ownership over one's body

30th Tuesday, June 2020
Support Healthy Living for Your Child:
Ensure child rights now and have a thriving community. Rights allow children to grow up healthy and free.
The 1989 Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC) defines a child as "any human being below the age of eighteen years, unless under the law applicable to the child, majority is attained earlier.  
Children's rights includes their right to association with both parents,  human identity as well as the basic needs for physical protection, food, universal state-paid education, health care, and criminal laws appropriate for the age and development of the child, equal protection of the child's civil rights, and freedom from discrimination on the basis of the child's racegendersexual orientationgender identitynational originreligiondisabilitycolorethnicity, or other characteristics. Interpretations of children's rights range from allowing children the capacity for autonomous action to the enforcement of children being physically, mentally and emotionally free from abuse, though what constitutes "abuse" is a matter of debate. Other definitions include the rights to care and nurturing. There are no definitions of other terms used to describe young people such as "adolescents", "teenagers", or "youth" in international law. The field of children's rights spans the fields of lawpoliticsreligion, and morality.

1st Wednesday, July 2020
Support Healthy Living for Your Child:
It may take one a whole day listing the difference between emotional and psychological abuse. Both are distinct from physical abuse, which involves hitting, slapping, pushing, pinching, pulling, restraining, or other physical means to control another person. 
Emotional and psychological abuse may not leave physical marks, but they are as destructive as physical abuse, leading to anxiety, depression, and addiction. Like physical abuse, they are primarily a means of control and a way for the abuser to feel superior. They are also more insidious because emotional and psychological abusers are evasive and often make you believe you are at fault. Distinguishing emotional abuse from psychological abuse is tricky because emotions generally fall under the umbrella of psychology. However, some people find it useful to separate the two.

2nd Thursday, July 2020
Support Healthy Living for Your Child:
Say No to Psychological Abuse
Psychological abuse is typically characterised by an abuser distorting someone’s sense of reality. This is also called gas lighting. The goal of the psychological abuser is to convince the victim that she’s crazy or incompetent. He might, for example, insist that some event happened in a much different way than she remembered, to the extent that basic, verifiable facts about the situation were different. It could be something like “No, you didn’t wear your red jacket; you wore your blue jacket. Don’t you remember?” Convincing someone her memory is imperfect in these small matters sets the stage for larger deceptions later on. While it’s normal for people to remember events differently or to forget minor details, a psychological abuser will distort facts with the intent of undermining your confidence and making you more pliable. Children, who are provided psychological growth support face, can try out things on their own, life’s challenges and engage in problem-solving with confidence. This improves on their relationships, team-work skills, confidence and autonomy.

3rd Friday, July 2020
Support Healthy Living for Your Child:
Say No to Emotional Abuse
Emotional abuse is more wide-ranging and, some would say, encompasses psychological abuse. Emotional abusers aim to manipulate other people by undermining their self-esteem or resorting to coercive behaviors. Emotional abusers may be prone to shouting or name-calling. They may behave in a disparaging or patronizing way to make you feel stupid or incompetent. They may present ultimatums, such as telling you to do what she wants or she’s leaving. Emotional abusers often blame their victims for their own emotional reactions or blame them for their own unhappiness. They may withhold affection until they get their way. They have no problem with disparaging you in front of your friends. Some may go so far as to control the money or hold your things hostage so you’ll do what they want. They may invade your privacy by going through your things or reading your text messages. Children who are provided emotional growth support face life’s challenges and engage in problem-solving with confidence. This improves on their confidence and autonomy.

 4th Saturday, July 2020
Support Healthy Living for Your Child:
Do not abandon children. If you do they will not get a chance to get cared for or set foot in a school. They are left to fend for themselves on the streets. They suffer from many forms of violence. They do not have access to even primary healthcare. They are subjected to cruel and inhumane treatments every day. They are children – innocent, young and beautiful – who are deprived of their rights. In the history of human rights, the rights of children are the most ratified. The United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (UNCRC) defines Child Rights as the minimum entitlements and freedoms that should be afforded to every citizen below the age of 18 regardless of race, national origin, colour, gender, language, religion, opinions, origin, wealth, birth status, disability, or other characteristics. The Convention on the Rights of the Child has been instrumental in putting all the issues pertaining to children issues on the global as well as national agenda. In addition to this, it has extensively mobilized actions for the realization of the rights and development of children worldwide.
It took so much activism in shaping favourable, positive and constructive attitudes toward children, and also inciting actions to improve their well-being. The enormous efforts involved toward the implementation of the Convention, the significant amount of resources committed to this cause, and the overall effectiveness of the systems put in place for the execution process have a bearing on the success of child well-being outcomes.
 5th Sunday, July 2020
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Impact of the Convention of the Child Rights
The Convention on the Rights of the Child has been instrumental in putting all the issues pertaining to children issues on the global as well as national agenda. In addition to this, it has extensively mobilized actions for the realization of the rights and development of children worldwide.
Over the last 20 or so years, implementation of the Convention and its effect on child well-being varied from country to country and from one region of the world to the other. Based on analysis, there has been outstanding progress at a global level in addressing the issues related to children. These include progress in access to services, reaching their fullest potential through education, enactment of laws that upholds the principle of the best interests of child, and child survival.

6th Monday, July 2020
Support Healthy Living for Your Child:
Impact of the Convention of the Child Rights
The Convention on the Rights of the Child has been instrumental in putting all the issues pertaining to children issues on the global as well as national agenda. In addition to this, it has extensively mobilized actions for the realization of the rights and development of children worldwide.
Though a noteworthy progress has been achieved, this is not the case in developing countries. So, we call upon all of you to join efforts to put the relevant rules and policies and ensure enforcement initiatives. There are barriers, several factors that forbid effective implementation of the laws and cultures that do not stigmatize child-care efforts. Concrete child development outcomes are possible. This will address the condition of underprivileged kids and underprivileged youth which are Africa’s harsh realities. It needs urgent attention. There is a need to intensify efforts for children welfare at all levels to implement the rules and provisions of the Convention and contribute to create a world suitable for children.

7th Tuesday, July 2020
Support Healthy Living for Your Child:
What are general principles of the Child Convention?
The Convention on the Rights of the Child has been instrumental in putting all the issues pertaining to children issues on the global as well as national agenda. In addition to this, it has extensively mobilized actions for the realization of the rights and development of children worldwide.
There are four articles in the convention that are seen as special. They’re known as the “General Principles” and they help to interpret all the other articles and play a fundamental role in realising all the rights in the Convention for all children. They are:
1.     Non-discrimination (article 2)
2.     Best interest of the child (article 3)
3.     Right to life survival and development (article 6)
4.     Right to be heard (article 12)

8th Wednesday, July 2020
Support Healthy Living for Your Child:
What are Optional Protocols of the Child Convention?
The Convention also contains a number of agreements to add further unique rights for children which are optional for countries – they are called “Optional Protocols”. They include:
1.     The Optional Protocol on the involvement of children in armed conflict
This requires governments to increase the minimum age that children can join the armed forces from 15 years and to ensure that members of their armed forces under the age of 18 do not take a direct part in armed conflict.
2.     The Optional Protocol to the Convention on the sale of children, child prostitution and child pornography
This provides detailed requirements for governments to end the sexual exploitation and abuse of children. It also protects children from being sold for non-sexual purposes, such as other forms of forced labour, illegal adoption and organ donation.
3.     The Optional Protocol on a communications procedure
This allows children to submit a complaint to the United Nations when their rights have been violated and their own country’s legal system were not able to offer a solution.


Conclusion:
We must provide opportunities for children to grow and develop in contexts that affirm their dignity; protect them from vulnerability; and which ensure the child can lead a happy and fulfilling quality life. Every child has the right to be born well, to be cared for and raised well.


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